Role of family-based immigration in the U.S. immigration system
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Role of family-based immigration in the U.S. immigration system hearing before the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Tenth Congress, first session, May 8, 2007. by United States. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary. Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law.

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Published by U.S. G.P.O., For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Immigrants -- United States,
  • United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesRole of family based immigration in the U.S. immigration system
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 138 p. :
Number of Pages138
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14563424M
ISBN 100160792754
ISBN 109780160792755
LC Control Number2007467237
OCLC/WorldCa170973648

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  The contributions of family-based immigrants to the U.S. economy, local communities, and the national fabric are manifold. They account for a significant portion of domestic economic growth, contribute to the well-being of the current and future labor force, play a key role in business development and community improvement, and are among the most upwardly mobile segments of the labor force. role of family-based immigration in the u.s. immigration system hearing before the subcommittee on immigration, citizenship, refugees, border security, and international law of the committee on the judiciary house of representatives one hundred tenth congress first session may 8, serial no. –26 printed for the use of the committee on.   Since the enactment of the Immigration and Nationality Act in , legal immigration to the United States has been based primarily on the family ties or the work skills of prospective immigrants. Under the provisions of current immigration law, the family-based immigration category allows U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents (LPRs), or “green card” holders, to bring certain . Family-based immigration requires the participation of at least two family members, a petitioner and a beneficiary. The petitioner must be a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident that wants to sponsor a foreign family member for a green card. The beneficiary is .

  The U.S. immigration policy that allows U.S. citizens and green card holders to sponsor other relatives to come to the U.S. was first introduced 50 years ago by an immigration hard liner in . Family reunification has long had a central role in the U.S. immigration system, more so than some other major immigrant-receiving countries. (Family migration accounts for about 40 percent of all permanent immigration across Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries). Family-based immigration constitutes one of the principal means of immigration to the United States. Family members can immigrate either as an immediate relative of a U.S. citizen or through the family preference system. The first step in the family-based immigration process is for a US citizen or lawful permanent resident to petition for a visa for a close family member. However, after a family-based visa petition is approved, many beneficiaries face multi-year backlogs, based on numerical caps by nationality and by visa preference category.

  Somewhat ironically, the family-based preferences inserted into the Immigration Act were an overtly racist, late-game effort to preserve the historically white majority of the United States.   On 5/8/07, the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law of the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on "The Role of Family-Based Immigration in the U.S. Immigration System." Testimony presented at the hearing is available below. Role of Family-Based Immigration in the U.S. Immigration System Tuesday, May 8, AM Rayburn HOB Introduction The current family-based immigration system should be retained, its numbers should be expanded, and a re-orientation of the manner of . Family-based Immigration: Nuts And Bolts, edited by Charles Wheeler of Catholic Legal Immigration Network (CLINIC), is a practical guide to all aspects of family-based immigration, including immediate relatives and the preference system, application process for permanent residence, consular processing, immigrating through marriage, grounds of inadmissability, the affidavit of support, and.